AMLO, Díaz-Canel

Cuba, the OAS and the myth of Mexican solidarity

LAS TUNAS, Cuba. — Forgetting that the Heads of State and Government meeting at the Third Summit of the Americas —held from April 20 to 22, 2001 in Quebec, Canada— adopted a clause that establishes: “any unconstitutional alteration or rupture of the democratic order in a State of the Hemisphere constitutes an insurmountable obstacle for the participation of the government of that State in the Summits of the Americas process.”

Today, going against the very acts signed by his country, the president of Mexico, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO)has become a defender of the dictatorships of Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela against the United States, the host country of the upcoming Summit, which, by denying the assistance of the rulers of those countries, has only acted in accordance with the Quebec clause .

May AMLO’s litigation serve to dispel a myth that, although it has already been perfectly documented by American researchers from an academic point of view, journalistically has not received the deserved publicity due to public interest, contributing that silence to the maintenance of an old apology, the praise that, by self-determination, Mexico did not break relations with Cuba when all the member countries of the Organization of American States (OAS) did so, which imposed collective, diplomatic and economic sanctions on the regime of then Prime Minister Fidel Castro.

Although Cuba had already been excluded from the OAS on January 22, 1962, it was not until July 26, 1964 when, in response to the discovery of a cache of arms traced to the island in December 1963 and a formal complaint presented by Venezuela, the OAS voted 15-4 in favor of ending diplomatic and commercial relations with the Castro regime.

Chile, Uruguay, Bolivia and Mexico voted against the OAS resolution, but only Mexico refused to abide by the breaking of relations with Cuba, for which the Mexican government was happily praised by the Castro regime for “resisting” the “pressures ” and the “blackmail” of “Yankee imperialism” in its eagerness to “isolate Cuba”.

But it was all a staging that Machiavelli would have applauded. And if Machiavellianism is synonymous with hypocrisy, the position of the Mexican government could not be more Machiavellian. It turns out that before the OAS vote, and as documented by US academics, the United States, Brazil and Mexico agreed on the convenience of maintaining a Latin American embassy in Havana, for which an OAS country, in this case Mexico, had to maintain relations with Cuba.

The agreement was so secretly operational that not even the president of the United States knew about it. It was necessary for the then Secretary of State, Dean Rusk, to warn President Lyndon B. Johnson so that, in his first meeting with President-elect Díaz Ordaz, he would not protest against Mexico’s decision to maintain relations with Cuba when all of Latin America had broken diplomatic ties with the regime in Havana.

Now, instead of adopting a false rebellion and in the name of a social justice that is not such, to support a dictatorship, AMLO should serve democracy, but not in a secret way, as did his countrymen, President López Mateo and his successors. , but openly, acknowledging that he was wrong to deny that there is a dictatorship in Cuba. And instead of litigating in favor of the almighty Communist Party and its generals, defend the humble. The Summit of the Americas is a good platform. Go, AMLO, and say, but stay away from cynicism.

OPINION ARTICLE
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