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February 8, 2022
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Controversy in Venezuela: they hand over the headquarters of El Nacional to Diosdado Cabello

Controversy in Venezuela: they hand over the headquarters of El Nacional to Diosdado Cabello

Miguel Henrique Otero, editor-in-chief of the newspaper El Nacional de Venezuela, spoke at 6AM Hoy Por Hoy on the controversial decision of the Venezuelan Justice to hand over the headquarters of this media outlet to Diosdado Cabello, for a ‘defamation’ debt of 13 million dollars.

“It is a dark time for freedom of expression. They have been closing and silencing media outlets. The website continues and we are going to continue fighting, but the headquarters, with a defamation lawsuit, reached that 13 million dollars should be paid and took over the building. With the Army they removed all the people who work there, “he said.

On the other hand, he sent a strong criticism to the government of Nicolás Maduro and He said it is a repressive dictatorship.

“It is a dictatorship. We are used to these strong and repressive dictatorships in Latin America. They are criminal associations that hijack a country. Even alliances with Colombian guerrillas, ELN, Iranians, etc..”, He said.



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