Stones rain down from the top of the building of the Ministry of Public Health in Havana

Stones rain down from the top of the building of the Ministry of Public Health in Havana

From the facade under repair of the Ministry of Public Health, in the central Rampa of 23rd Street, in Havana, numerous stones fell this Monday. They were not large, but they were large enough that, given the height from which they fell, they would have caused a head injury to any passerby.

The only signal that anyone walking on the sidewalk at that time could have to protect themselves was the alert from a building custodian: “Walk fast, walk fast, don’t let it fall on you.”

“Is this normal?” A woman who was passing by at the time blurted out. “Stones are falling into the street, there are no signs, they have not stopped traffic. One passes by with a car and they break its windshield, and what do you do?”

Upwards, a green mesh can be seen that barely covers part of the scaffolding placed for the building works. Minutes later, two workers scrambled to sweep the debris from the street.

Less security measures are seen in the works of the controversial tower of K and 23also in Havana’s Vedado, from where a considerable size piece of wood was shot out, also this Monday.

Also on Monday, a large piece of wood was thrown from the tower at K and 23rd.  (14ymedio)

In this case, the building does not have protective mesh, something for which it has been criticized by various specialists.

The board was dodged by a man in his thirties, to the shock of the rest of the passers-by. “That’s why I don’t go through here,” one of them said to the young man, who was livid. “Because anything that falls kills anyone and nothing happens.”

The building does not have protective mesh, something for which it has been criticized by various specialists.  (14ymedio)

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